150 Books for Africa – 150 Comment Challenge

Inspired by Jennifer Hubbard, I’m issuing a challenge to you, the reader, to make me send 150 books to Africa. According to the Books for Africa website, it takes 50 cents to send a book to a child in Africa. I’ll donate 50 cents for every comment on this post by a unique commenter, up to 150 books/comments.

All you have to do is leave a comment naming a book you think every kid in the world should read, including kids in Africa (you can name the same book somebody else already named; don’t worry about that.)

This post will be open for comments for two weeks, or until the goal of 150 comments is reached.

87 thoughts on “150 Books for Africa – 150 Comment Challenge

  1. Oh, there are so many… I’m going to name Where the Wild Things Are, because the trailer looks so brilliant, and that was a book that truly opened my imagination. :)

  2. I’m sending money to Books for Africa as well – sweet!

    Books all kids should read, huh? Um, GOOD NIGHT MOON?

  3. I think every person in the world should read Dr. Seuss. (If they’re too young, they should have the stories read to them.)

  4. I’m going to say THE LION, THE WITCH, AND THE WARDROBE. It’s fun & great for a lot of reasons & every kid needs to be reminded that a world of magic exists just around the corner …

  5. I’m going to go with Sitti’s Secrets. It’s a relatively recent title that one of my girls picked up and whenever we read it we’re reminded of how everyone loves the same, no matter where in the world they live. And the illustrations are just lovely.

  6. Phantom Tollbooth, everyone should go on such a grand adventure. Though if Mudville made its way to Africa, I know it would make more than a few kids cheer.

  7. Every kid in the world should get to read a Bible story book in their own language. And the sacred books of their own religion, and those of the faiths of their family members, friends, community members, neighbors, strangers… Thanks for sending the books!

  8. We visited the library every week as a child and I proudly presented my dogeared card to take out the maximum number allowed. Now, libraries provide lifeblood to my work and serenity in the chaos of frenetic lifestyles. Libraries on line make it easier to reach vast quantities of sources across the world.
    Africa should have that advantage too. :)

  9. There’s nothing like the endless possibilites of a library ~ Thank you so much for opening this up benefit readers in Africa.

  10. I would suggest A Kick in the Head (poems selected by Paul Janeczko with amazing illustrations by Chris Raschka). This is a poetry book that uses poetry to demonstrate and teach poetic forms to children – but it’s great for adults as well. I’ve personally made sure that it was placed in three libraries – it is a delight.
    Thanks Kurtis for this wonderful project!

  11. Just one? But the book that’s most important to each kid will be different.

    Okay, I’ll say . . . Mudville (’cause I’m loving it right now) and . . . Bridge to Terabithia . . . and . . . Out of the Dust . . . and . . ., oh, all right.

    Thanks for doing this, Kurtis. Bloggin’ for books? What a grand idea!

    Donna (Now, pony up the fifty cents, Mister.)

  12. So many choices, but two of my favorite read-alouds would be “Goodnight Moon” and “Runaway Bunny.” And add one more. . . “Go Dog Go!”

  13. A book that every child in the world should read? A lovely wordless picture book is L’Album d’Adele by Claude Ponti. Just to stretch the recommendations out beyond the standards but it’s great fun.

    Thank you Kurtis!

  14. Thanks for being a part of this wonderful library lovin’ challenge. I’m in on it too.

    Books saved me until I was strong enough to save myself.

    What book should every child read?

    A Visitor for Bear by Bonny Becker

  15. Hi Kurtis!!! (waves)

    To Kill a Mockingbird

    tho it’s for the high school set.

    For the younger set:
    We’re going on a Bear Hunt

    Thanks for your generosity and all the best on your debut novel! Saw it at Barnes and Noble, face out:)
    Bev

  16. You’ve picked a wonderful choice.

    I’d say Harold and the Purple Crayon or Goodnight Moon.

    Good luck! I started a challenge of my own today, these were so inspiring!

  17. We just completed our district-wide book drive, and we are sending 1,538 books to Botswana! Visit the African Library site for more info.
    As far as a favorite book, I’d have to say Stand Tall, Molly Lou Melon, since no one has mentioned it yet. Thanks, Kurtis!

  18. Guess How Much I Love You, Sam McBratney

    If only every child could feel that loved.

    Glad to be a small part of this.

  19. Four Feet, Two Sandals by Karen Williams and Khadra Mohammed.

    Thank you, thank you for what you are doing!

  20. Everyone should read ALICE’s ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND. It’s a story with which many claim to be familiar, but not everyone has really, truly read it – and they should.

  21. Hi Curtis,

    I think every little kid should be able to read, “The Little Engine that Could” and every middle schooler, “The Miracle Worker”.

    Thanks for doing this project! It will help.

  22. It’s too hard to pick just one book and consider the various age levels. A book that is entertaining, educational and not culturally exclusive would be great.

  23. Every child should be able to read a book about kids who look like them. Teens and younger YA readers need books, too. I recommend Out of Bounds by Beverly Naidoo.

    Thanks for participating in this challenge.

  24. Wonderful idea and many wonderful books have been suggested.

    I’d for for Winni-the-Pooh AND any of the Oz books.

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  27. How about the one I read to your wife (my little sister)when she was young? Free To Be You and Me! Yes, it’s hard to pick just one, I also had Ramona The Pest and Pippi Lockstocking in mind. Funny little girls getting in and out of trouble, and not a vampire or wizard in sight!

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